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1
Horace Misken
England and Wales Census, 1861
Name Horace Misken
County Sussex
Event Type Census
Event Date 1861
Event Place Middleton, Sussex, England
Registration District Westhampnett
Residence Note Flansham
Gender Male
Age 7
Occupation Scholar
Relationship to Head of Household Son
Birth Year (Estimated) 1854
Birthplace Middleton, Sussex
Page Number 8
Registration Number RG09
Piece/Folio 619 / 67
Affiliate Record Type Household
HOUSEHOLD, ROLE, GENDER, AGE, BIRTHPLACE

Thomas Misken Head M 39 Hoo, Kent
Mary Ann Misken Wife F 37 Burham, Kent
Thomas Misken Son M 11 Rochester, Kent
John Misken Son M 10 Middleton, Sussex
Horace Misken Son M 7 Middleton, Sussex
Edgar Misken Son M 5 Middleton, Sussex
William Misken Son M 3 Middleton, Sussex
George Misken Son M 2 Middleton, Sussex 
Family F2017
 
2 Joseph of Arimathaea, according to all four Gospels of the New Testament, a rich Jew of Arimathaea, probably a member of the Sanhedrin, the ancient Jewish court in Jerusalem, who after the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, requested the body from the Roman procurator Pontius Pilate and placed it in his own tomb. According to some ancient writers he was later the founder of Christianity in Britain and of a monastery at Glastonbury; scholars, however, reject these claims. In the Arthurian cycle of romances and in late medieval legend he brings the Holy Grail into Britain. There is no known Biblical connection to show his genealogical connection to this family as of this date.

----------------------------------------

REF: "Britannia Internet Magazine": Joseph of Arimathea was a wealthy disciple of Jesus, who, according to the book of Matthew 27:57-60, asked Pontius Pilate for permission to take Jesus' dead body in order to prepare it for burial. He also provided the tomb where the crucified Lord was laid until his Resurrection. Joseph is mentioned in a few times in parallel passages in Mark, Luke and John, but nothing further is heard about his later activities. Legend, however, supplies us with the rest of his story by claiming that Joseph, accompanying the Apostle Philip on a preaching mission to Gaul, was sent to Britain for the purpose of converting the island to Christianity. The year 63 AD is commonly given for this "event", with 37 AD sometimes being put forth as an alternative. It was said that Joseph achieved his wealth in the metals trade, and in the course of conducting his business, he probably became acquainted with Britain, at least the southwestern parts of it. Cornwall was a chief mining district and
well-known in the Roman empire for its tin and other metals. Some have even said that Joseph was the uncle of Jesus, and that he may have brought the young boy along on one of his business trips to the island. It was only natural, then, that Joseph should have been chosen for the first mission to Britain, and appropriate that he should come first to Glastonbury, that gravitational center for legendary activity in the West Country. Much more was added to Joseph's legend during the middle ages, and he was gradually inflated into a major saint and cult hero. For example, he is said to have brought with him either a cup, said to have been used at the Last Supper and also used to catch the blood dripping from Christ as he hung on the Cross. A variation of this story is that Joseph brought with him two cruets, one containing the blood and the other, the sweat of Christ. Either of these items are known as The Holy Grail, and were the object(s) of the quests of the Knights of King Arthur's Round Table. The legend goes on to suggest that Joseph hid the "Grail" in Chalice Well at Glastonbury for safe-keeping. There is a wide variance of scholarly opinion on this subject, however, and a good deal of doubt exists as to whether Joseph ever came to Britain at all, for any purpose.
.......................................................................
Joseph of Arimathea was a wealthy disciple of Jesus, who, according to the book of Matthew 27:57-60, asked Pontius Pilate for permission to take Jesus' dead body in order to prepare it for burial. He also provided the tomb where the crucified Lord was laid until his Resurrection. Joseph is mentioned in a few times in parallel passages in Mark, Luke and John, but nothing further is heard about his later activities.

Apocryphal legend, however, supplies us with the rest of his story by claiming that Joseph accompanied the Apostle Philip, Lazarus, Mary Magdalene & others on a preaching mission to Gaul. Lazarus & Mary stayed in Marseilles, while the others travelled north. At the English Channel, St. Philip sent Joseph, with twelve disciples, to establish Christianity in the most far-flung corner of the Roman Empire: the Island of Britain. The year AD 63 is commonly given for this "event", with AD 37 sometimes being put forth as an alternative. It was said that Joseph achieved his wealth in the metals trade, and in the course of conducting his business, he probably became acquainted with Britain, at least the south-western parts of it. Cornwall was a chief mining district and well-known in the Roman empire for its tin. Somerset was reknowned for its high quality lead. Some have even said that Joseph was the uncle of the Virgin Mary and therefore of Jesus, and that he may have brought the young boy along on one of his business trips to the island. Hence the words of Blake's famous hymn, Jerusalem:

And did those feet, in ancient time, walk upon England's mountains green?

It was only natural, then, that Joseph should have been chosen for the first mission to Britain, and appropriate that he should come first to Glastonbury, that gravitational center for legendary activity in the West Country. Local legend has it that Joseph sailed around Land's End and headed for his old lead mining haunts. Here his boat ran ashore in the Glastonbury Marshes and, together with his followers, he climbed a nearby hill to survey the surrounding land. Having brought with him a staff grown from Christ's Holy Crown of Thorns, he thrust it into the ground and announced that he and his twelve companions were "Weary All". The thorn staff immediately took miraculous root, and it can be seen there still on Wearyall Hill. Joseph met with the local ruler, Arviragus, and soon secured himself twelve hides of land at Glastonbury on which to build the first monastery in Britain. From here he became the country's evangelist.

Much more was added to Joseph's legend during the Middle Ages. He was gradually inflated into a major saint and cult hero, as well as the supposed ancestor of many British monarchs. He is said to have brought with him to Britain a cup, said to have been used at the Last Supper and also used to catch the blood dripping from Christ as he hung on the Cross. A variation of this story is that Joseph brought with him two cruets, one containing the blood and the other, the sweat of Christ. Either of these items are known as The Holy Grail, and were the object(s) of the quests of the Knights of King Arthur's Round Table. One legend goes on to suggest that Joseph hid the "Grail" in Chalice Well at Glastonbury for safe-keeping (Photo)

There is a wide variance of scholarly opinion on this subject, however, and a good deal of doubt exists as to whether Joseph ever came to Britain at all, for any purpose.
-----------------------------
Joseph of Arimathea
All that is known for certain concerning him is derived from the canonical Gospels. He was born at Arimathea -- hence his surname -- "a city of Judea" (Luke, xxiii, 51), which is very likely identical with Ramatha, the birthplace of the Prophet Samuel, although several scholars prefer to identify it with the town of Ramleh. He was a wealthy Israelite (Matt., xxvii, 57), "a good and a just man" (Luke, xxiii, 50), "who was also himself looking for the kingdom of God" (Mark, xv, 43). He is also called by St. Mark and by St. Luke a bouleutes, literally, "a senator", whereby is meant a member of the Sanhedrin or supreme council of the Jews. He was a disciple of Jesus, probably ever since Christ's first preaching in Judea (John, ii, 23), but he did not declare himself as such "for fear of the Jews" (John, xix, 38). On account of this secret allegiance to Jesus, he did not consent to His condemnation by the Sanhedrin (Luke, xxiii, 51), and was most likely absent from the meeting which sentenced Jesus to death (cf. Mark, xiv, 64).

The Crucifixion of the Master quickened Joseph's faith and love, and suggested to him that he should provide for Christ's burial before the Sabbath began. Unmindful therefore of all personal danger, a danger which was indeed considerable under the circumstances, he boldly requested from Pilate the Body of Jesus, and was successful in his request (Mark, xv, 43-45). Once in possession of this sacred treasure, he -- together with Nicodemus, whom his courage had likewise emboldened, and who brought abundant spices -- wrapped up Christ's Body in fine linen and grave bands, laid it in his own tomb, new and yet unused, and hewn out of a rock in a neighbouring garden, and withdrew after rolling a great stone to the opening of the sepulchre (Matt., xxvii, 59, 60; Mark, xv, 46; Luke, xxiii, 53; John, xix, 38-42). Thus was fulfilled Isaiah's prediction that the grave of the Messias would be with a rich man (Is., liii, 9). The Greek Church celebrates the feast of Joseph of Arimathea on 31 July, and the Roman Church on 17 March. The additional details which are found concerning him in the apocryphal "Acta Pilati", are unworthy of credence. Likewise fabulous is the legend which tells of his coming to Gaul A.D. 63, and thence to Great Britain, where he is supposed to have founded the earliest Christian oratory at Glastonbury. Finally, the story of the translation of the body of Joseph of Arimathea from Jerusalem to Moyenmonstre (Diocese of Toul) originated late and is unreliable.
FRANCIS E. GIGOT
Transcribed by Mike McLeod
The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII
Copyright © 1910 by Robert Appleton Company
Online Edition Copyright © 2003 by Kevin Knight
Nihil Obstat, October 1, 1910. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor
Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08520a.htm
-----------------------------------

"Joseph of Arimathea, the Holy Grail and the Turin Shroud"
ABSTRACT
by
Daniel C. Scavone
University of Southern Indiana
Copyright 1996 All Rights Reserved
Reprinted by permission.

Editor's Note: Professor Dan Scavone is a noted author and historian and a highly regarded Shroud researcher whose detailed paper on this subject is soon to be published in a professional journal. His book, "The Shroud of Turin", was published in 1989. See the "Shroud Booklist" for the complete reference.

Joseph's "history" begins and ends in the Gospels (late 1st- 2nd c.). Yet his name has been a prominent factor in the apocryphal Eastern Christian tradition and in Western romance. My premise that the burial shroud of Jesus was the original object underlying the legends of the Holy Grail cannot be absolutely proved, but the association of both with Joseph of Arimathea and the absence of any other scenario universally accepted by scholars suggest the plausibility of the premise.

A common idea joins Joseph's New Testament (NT) and his medieval legendary roles: his association with the body of Jesus. In the NT he provided the burial sheet that enclosed Jesus's bloody corpse; and in 12th-13th c. romances he was the first guardian of the Holy Grail, variously given out as a dish holding a communion wafer (i.e., body of Jesus), as the cup that had contained the blood of Jesus consecrated at the Last Supper or dripping from his crucified body, finally as a Dysgl bearing a bleeding head.

This paper explores the evidence that begins in the 4th c. for the survival in Edessa (today Urfa, Turkey) and later in Constantinople of a bloodstained burial sheet, widely considered throughout the Byzantine and Syriac Middle Ages as the very cloth Joseph of Arimathea bought for the burial of Jesus. This eyewitness literary evidence persistently relates that the sheet also bore a faint impression of Jesus's crucified body. A 6th c. text calls this cloth a sindon, NT word for burial shroud, and a tetradiplon, suggesting that it was seen folded in eight layers.

The documents attesting this full-body image migrated westward by the 8th c. Latin accounts of the Edessa cloth-icon remark how this awe-inspiring object had been kept hidden away in treasuries, and shown to the masses only rarely and amidst mysterious ritual. Thus there were relatively few individuals, East or West, who actually experienced this cloth first hand, who knew precisely what it was, or read these Latin accounts.

In 944 the Edessa icon was transported to Constantinople. Byzantine artists were finally allowed to paint reproductions which show us that this cloth was indeed kept folded in a rectangular case--presumably as a tetradiplon--whose lid permitted Jesus's face to be visible in a central circular aperture. This seems to be why the earliest 4th c. text described only a facial image. It was only gradually understood to be a bloodstained burial shroud.

That which was thought to be the actual burial wrap of Jesus was kept largely unexhibited in Constantinople from 944 to 1204 (time of the 4th Crusade). Numerous but little informed Western travelers and crusaders reflect a confusion born of this secrecy. Thus, though they may have heard it whispered to be something intimately identified with the body and blood of Jesus and associated with Joseph, the object's true nature as burial cloth was unclear. But something about its rumored looks caused it to be compared, in Britain and Brittany, with the "dish of plenty" or the "Dysgl with Bran's head in a pool of blood," the graal of Welsh- Irish mythology. As something unique and awesome, the reputed shroud of Jesus assumed, in the imaginative romance literature of the West, the differing forms of the Holy Grail; the fact that Joseph of Arimathea was associated with both establishes him as the link which identifies the imaged and bloodstained burial wrap of Jesus as the physical object that inspired the Christian legends of the Holy Grail. I obviously take the position that there never was a real cup-Grail or dish-Grail.

Besides these mutual associations with body, blood, or head of Jesus and linkage with Joseph, both Grail and shroud share rituals and a "secret," deriving from the most probable etymology of "grail": Latin gradalis or "by degrees." In Grail rituals the secret was its gradual revelation, to any knight allowed to experience it, of a series of changes, from infant Jesus to crucified Jesus. If the Grail held the actual blood of Jesus, any further secret was superfluous, anticlimactic, and artificial. In Edessan and Constantinopolitan rituals, the image on the burial shroud was revealed to congregations only gradually, by raising it (accordian style, I surmise), section by section. Texts describe it as beginning as infant Jesus and becoming the entire crucified body. Is the icon's secret the basis of the Grail's secret?

My paper now adduces further documentation as evidence that Joseph was never in the West, but rather that the earliest reference placing him in Britain was in reality a reference to Edessa, whose royal palace complex was called Britio Edessenorum. The confusion arose from the similarity of the names. Also, a 5th c. Georgian (Russia) MS relates that Joseph captured Jesus's blood as it dripped from his crucified body not in a cup-Grail--but in the burial shroud itself. Grail and shroud are here identified!

If Joseph, associated with both Grail and burial wrap, must be relocated, even if not literally, to Edessa/Britio, the possibility is even greater that Grail and imaged burial shroud are one and the same, or that the shroud was the object that inspired the Grail literature. Finally, the imaged shroud of Constantinople disappeared during the 4th Crusade of 1204. The romances of the Grail quest were produced in precisely this same period.

In 1978, Ian Wilson published a surprising break-through in the history of the Turin Shroud: that the Edessa icon was in fact unfolded to reveal the Shroud still in Turin today. It was the latter that "disappeared," according to Robert of Clari, after the fall of Constantinople in 1204, the same that reappeared in Lirey about 1355 in possession of Geoffroy de Charny.

The present hypothesis reinforces Wilson's discovery, and it tentatively identifies the Turin Shroud as the real object that inspired the romances of the Holy Grail.
Source: http://www.shroud.com/scavone2.htm
----------------------------------------------
A Discussion of Joseph of Arimathea's Legendary Descent
By David Nash Ford http://www.britannia.com/history/articles/josanc.html

ST. JOSEPH OF ARIMATHEA Ancestor of Kings?

Early Welsh Genealogies show us that most of the Early British Monarchies claimed descent in one way or another from Beli Mawr (the Great) who can be identified with the Celtic God, Belenos. However, in his mortal form, Beli was said to have been the husband of Anna, the daughter of St. Joseph of Arimathea.

At first sight, this claim may seem quite extraordinary. St. Joseph was the man who had taken Christ's body down from the cross and given up his own tomb for Christ's last resting-place. Apocryphal legend tells us that Joseph of Arimathea was the Virgin Mary's paternal uncle. After the resurrection, he left Palestine with Saints Philip, Lazarus, Mary Magdalene & others, and sailed through the Mediterranean to Southern France. Lazarus & Mary stayed in Marseilles, while the others travelled north. At the English Channel, St.Philip sent Joseph, with twelve disciples, to establish Christianity in the most far-flung corner of the Roman Empire.

Joseph had been chosen for such a task, because he knew Britain well already. He was a merchant by trade and had conducted business with the Dumnonian tin-miners and Durotrigian lead-miners of Britain many times before. Some even say that he sometimes brought his nephew, Jesus, with him on these trading missions. Hence the words of Blake's famous hymn, Jerusalem:

And did those feet, in ancient time,
Walk upon England's mountains green?

West Country legend has it that Joseph sailed around Land's End and headed for what was to eventually become Glastonbury in Somerset. Here his boat ran ashore and, together with his followers, he climbed a nearby hill to survey the surrounding land. Having brought with him a staff grown from Christ's Holy Crown of Thorns, he thrust it into the ground and announced that he and his twelve companions were "Weary All". The thorn staff immediately took miraculous root, and it can be seen there still on Wearyall Hill.

Joseph met with the local ruler and soon secured himself twelve hides of land at Glastonbury on which to build the first monastery in Britain. From here he became Britain's evangelist. So it is not surprising that the monarchies of that country wished to establish themselves as St. Joseph's descendants: especially considering the more pagan ancestors already claimed in their pedigrees. By marrying Joseph's daughter to a pre-Christian deity, the royal genealogists were able to show that Christianity had been victorious over the old pagan ways. But why specifically choose Beli Mawr as Anna's husband?

Chronologically speaking, if Anna married a Briton after her father arrived in this country, then we must assume that she was nearer to Jesus' age than her cousin, Mary (ie. born c. 0). Beli is recorded in the Mabinogion and Welsh Genealogies as having been the father of Caswallon (or Cassivellaunus), the leader of the Celtic tribes who repelled Cæsar's invasions of 55 & 54 bc. He could, therefore, not possibly have married Anna of Arimathea. Moreover, the local ruler whom Joseph received his land gift from, is said to have been Arfyrag (or Arviragus), Beli & Anna's supposed great great grandson.

In fact, here we have another case of pagan gods taking on the guise of Christian saints in order to smooth the path of conversion. For Celtic mythology tells us that Beli (or Belenos) did not marry a lady named Anna, but the great Celtic Goddess named Anu. Anu appears in the Celtic World under several names but they all stem from the same route: Anu, Danu, Dana, Don. She was a Mother-Goddess particularly associated with the founding and prosperity of Ireland. She was especially popular in Munster, though her most lasting memorial is a mountain in County Kerry called the "Breast of Anu" (Dá Chích Anann). St. Anne probably owes her popularity in Brittany to this goddess, as do the names of numerous St. Anne's Wells throughout Britain.

However, the claims of the British Kings cannot be quite so easily dismissed. The Celtic God-King, Bran Fendigaid (the Blessed), who may or may not have been an early King of Siluria, is also often accredited with being the man to have brought Christianity to the British Isles. Unfortunately, this is due to a confusion with the historical Cunobelin (Arfyrag's father) who, though he died prior to the Roman Invasion of AD 43, was thought to have been taken captive to Rome where he became converted to Christianity. He appears to be the same figure as the Ancestral Fisher-King of Arthurian legend, Bron or Brons, said, in late legend, to have been given the Holy Grail by St. Joseph of Arimathea. This was, in reality Bran's magic cauldron of Celtic myth. Brons was also thought to have been a relative of St. Joseph: the husband of his sister, Enygeus. The mythical Bran was Beli Mawr's grandson: just the right age to marry St. Joseph's daughter; and Enygeus is a Latin form of Anna. Could Bran have been her husband? Was he blessed by his father-in-law? 
JOSEPH, of Arimathea (I1772)
 
3 "THE LAND TAX ACT 1877."
Appeal No. 239.—Estate No. 830.—Martha Steel, appellant.
WE hereby amend the classification of this estate as fol-
The classification is hereby reduced from the 2nd class to
the 3rd class—(Corr.79/I74.S.)
Given uuder our hands this 25th day of August 1879.
ROBERT LE POER TRENCH,
ARCHD. FISKEN,
A. J. SKENE,
Commissioners of Land Tax.
*************************
Martha McWilliam was the daughter from the second marriage of Martha Saunders, born Martha Pulsford (c.1799-1851) of Tiverton, Devonshire whose first husband was William Saunders (c1795-1835), a blacksmith and wheelwright also from Tiverton. He was recruited in England in 1832 by the Van Diemen's Land Company and migrated to Van Diemen's Land on the ship "Sir Thomas Munro" with his wife Martha (nee Pulsford) and their sons William (jnr.) and James. A daughter, Emily, was born on board shortly after the ship left the English Downs on 18 September 1832. They disembarked at Circular Head, V.D.L. on 22 January 1833. 
STEELE, Martha . (I28)
 
4 (1789 in Mary McW letter??)Blacksmith,Mounthill

See G pettitts book P13 ref "McWilliamS" 
MCWILLIAM, Andrew Jr (I631)
 
5 (see Enos' Death Certificate ) Family F1895
 
6 (there is a record of one in Broadchalke) THORN, John (I5387)
 
7 (unsure) Family F2277
 
8 1 PROP Messuage, Timber, land, Stock in Trade
2 DATE 1808 
CLEMENT, Richard (I5348)
 
9 1 _FNRL
2 DATE 14TH MAR 1923
2 PLAC Wimborne Rd cemetery Bournemouth 
THOMAS, Samuel (I5281)
 
10 1861 census KING, Rowland (I3795)
 
11 1861 census KING, Sarah Anne (I3792)
 
12 2 DATE 1808 CLEMENT, William (I5352)
 
13 2 April 1871 Source (S41)
 
14 2 April 1911 Source (S148)
 
15 3 April 1881 Source (S32)
 
16 30 March 1851 Source (S46)
 
17 30 Sep 1916 - Took oath.
23 Oct 1916 - 3rd toe blown off by gun shot - whilst on holiday at Creswick.
23 Nov 1916 - 3rd and part of 2nd toe amputated.
4 Dec 1916 - Toe deemed to be healed.
12 Jan 1916 - Recommended for discharge.
13 Jan 1916 - Discharged.


 
WILDING, George Austin (I291)
 
18 31 March 1901 Source (S39)
 
19 42 Park grove, Burnley, Victoria, Australia IMRIE, James Brough (I700)
 
20 5 April 1891 Source (S40)
 
21 6 June 1841 Source (S48)
 
22 7 April 1861 Source (S47)
 
23 a POW? - iris WILKINSON, William Wallace (I2395)
 
24 A tall dark woman CRAWFORD, Agnes Ann (I887)
 
25 Accidentally Killed ADKINS, Henry Colin (I4533)
 
26 According to the 1851 census KING, Charles (I3791)
 
27 Adkins
Alice Jane
1959
71y
U-109 
ADKINS, Thomas Derry (I4531)
 
28 age 13 months CLEMENT, Susannah (I5304)
 
29 Age: 29 years 2 months
Height: 5 feet 9 1/2 inches
Weight: 140 lbs
Chest Measurement: 35-37 inches
Complexion: Dark
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Dark
Religious Denomination: Ch of Eng 
TREEBY, Thomas Arthur (I2396)
 
30 Alfred was approximately twenty three years of age when crowned in 871. Alfred fought against the Danes and won several important battles before designing a truce called teh Danelaw that sectioned off the Danes into Mercia, Northumbria, and
East Anglia. With the Danses quelled, he set about uniting and eduation England, whcih became a reality during his Athelstan's reign. he died of an unknown illness October 26, 899. (Everyday Life in the Middle Ages, Kenyon, p84)King Alfred
the Great (849, ruled 871-899) was one of the best kings ever to rule mankind. He defended Anglo-Saxon England from Viking raids, formulated a code of laws, and fostered a rebirth of religious and scholarly activity. His reign exhibits military
skill and innovation, sound governance and the ability to inspire men and plan for the future, piety and a practical commitment to the support of religion, personal scholarship and the promotion of education.

"Desire for and possession of earthly power never pleased me overmuch, and I did not unduly desire this earthly rule, but that nevertheless I wished for tools and resources for the task that I was commanded to accomplish, which was that I
should virtuously and worthily guide and direct the authority which was entrusted to me. You know of course that no one can make known any skill, nor direct and guide any authority, without tools and resources; a man cannot work on any
enterprise without resources. In the case of the king, the resources and tools with which to rule are that he have his land fully manned: he must have praying men, fighting men and working men. You also know that without these tools no king may
make his ability known. Another aspect of his resources is that he must have the means of support for his tools, the three classes of men. These, then are their means of support: land to live on, gifts, weapons, food, ale, clothing, and
whatever else is necessary for each of the three classes of men. Without these things he cannot maintain the tools, nor without the tools can he accomplish any of the things he was commanded to do. Accordingly, I sought the resources with which
to exercise the authority, in order that my skills and power would not be forgotten and concealed: because every skill and every authority is soon obsolete and passed over, if it is without wisdom; because no man may bring to bear any skill
without wisdom. For whatever is done unthinkingly, cannot be reckoned a skill. To speak briefly: I desired to live worthily as long as I lived, and to leave after my life, to the men who should come after me, the memory of me in good works."

-- from Alfred's translation of Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy, chapter XVII. [Keynes & Lapidge, pp 132-33.] This is an interpolation by Alfred, not in Boethius. As Alfred says in his preface, he has sometimes translated word for word,
and sometimes sense for sense. In a footnote (p. 298), Keynes & Lapidge caution that this paragraph should not be taken as King Alfred's personal credo. However, it rings true for me, and I acknowledge the man behind the words.

"The just man builds on a modest foundation and gradually proceeds to greater things."

-- Asser cites this saying when he is describing King Alfred's method of learning (chapter 88). Keynes and Lapidge say that the source of this quotation is unknown. I can imagine that this saying originated with Alfred himself. It perfectly
expresses his practical approach to development of his kingdom. In this saying "the just man" is to be understood, in more modern language, as meaning "the man of sound judgement".

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
WESSEX, King Alfred of the Great (I485)
 
31 Ann is a Widow on the 1911 census DAVIS, George (I3707)
 
32 As noted on the 1851 and 1861 census KING, Job (I3763)
 
33 As noted on the 1851 and 1861 census CRABB, Keturah (I3788)
 
34 As noted on the 1861 census KING, Edmund (I3790)
 
35 As noted on the 1861 census KING, Keturah Caroline (I3789)
 
36 As noted on the 1861 census KING, Samuel (I3794)
 
37 As noted on the Death registration LAKE, Leonard George (I2154)
 
38 As noted on the Death registration. HAWES, Gwenda Margaret (I1264)
 
39 BAPTISM: IGI

RESIDENCE: Pigot & Co's Trade Directory for Wiltshire 1830 - a John Clement shown on page 811

DEATH: ref. 5a 179 - although there is a death record, for a John Clement, our John is not shown as deceased in 1856 on his son Johns' marriage certificate 
CLEMENT, John (I5278)
 
40 BAPTISM: Received Christian baptism in the name of the father and of the son and of the holy ghost. Rev. Jones (Minister) CLEMENT, Barrie John (I5270)
 
41 BIOGRAPHY: http://www.centralcoastfhs.org.au/unrelateddeaths.html

BIOGRAPHY: Surname: BONNETT
Given Names: Frederick
Age: 72
Date of Death: 24-Jul-35
Place of Death: Mepiringa, Victoria
Spouse: Charity Lamerton Phillips
Parents: Simon & Margaret
Ref. D125 
GUY, Margaret (I1891)
 
42 BIOGRAPHY: Samuel and Martha McWilliam from north of Ireland arrived 1860 Vic. Samuel served in Victoria Police at Sale. Resigned and went to Corowa NSW 1877 where planted small vineyard. Son, John James McWilliam b1868 Sale became drover and in 1900 went 100 miles north to Junee NSW and there planted 50 acre vineyard. In 1913 planted 35,000 grape cuttings on two 50 acre blocks in newly-created River Murrumbidgee irrigation area at Griffith saying that the land is so fertile 'you can plant a three-inch nail this year and next year you've got a crowbar'. Today McWilliam's Wines one of Australia's greatest wine-making firms with head office at Pyrmont, Sydney.


BIOGRAPHY: - Irish Families in Australia and New Zealand.
Revised
Volume Three
McAfee - Quirk
1788 - 1991
By
Hubert William COFFEE
and Marjorie Jean MORGAN 
MCWILLIAM, Samuel Jr . (I27)
 
43 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I22)
 
44 BIRTH: 26 Dec 1868 - unfounded DEWAR, Elizabeth Aitken . (I25)
 
45 BIRTH: 2b 681

WILL: Among other bequests, Florence's Will leaves 200 to William Weeks of Brickworth Farm Cottage, Whiteparish, nr. Salisbury . 
CLEMENT, Florence Maud (I5283)
 
46 BIRTH: 5a 208 CLEMENT, Ernest Robert (I5396)
 
47 BIRTH: Birth registered by John Clement (father) 16th October 1865
REF 5A/1802 NOTE In Memoriam
From the local newspaper:

In sweetest memory of Dad, Charles Clement who passed on November 8th, 1933 - Gwyneth and Bert.
God saw that he was weary
And the hill was hard to climb
So he took his hand and whispered
"Peace be thine" 
CLEMENT, Charles (I5274)
 
48 BIRTH: Birth registered by Mary Ann Thorne (mother) 30th August 1861

DEATH: age 91

Birth certificate held 
THORNE, Emma (I5275)
 
49 BIRTH: JUN QTR 1849 ref. 8/270
Birth registered by Albert's mother, Margaret Clement 12th May 1849 
CLEMENT, Albert (I5301)
 
50 BIRTH: Jun qtr 1864 - ref 5a 153 Warminster, Wilts THORNE, Harry (I5398)
 

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